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Beethoven Symphony No. 9

When:

Sat 7 Jul 2012, 7:30pm–9:30pm

Where: Bethlehem College, 24 Elder Lane, Tauranga, Bay of Plenty

Restrictions: All Ages

Ticket Information:

  • Adult: $20.00
  • Senior: $15.00
  • Student: $10.00
  • Child: $5.00
  • Additional fees may apply

Website:

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Over 100 of New Zealand's best young musicians are joining forces to perform one of the greatest pieces of symphonic music in the world – Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9.

Auckland Youth Orchestra will present the work as part of their North Island tour, together with the Auckland Youth Choir, soprano Isabella Moore, alto Elisha Fa’i-Hulton, tenor Amitai Pati and baritone Anthony Schneider.

The concert is very reasonably priced with tickets from only $5 for children and up to $20 for adults.

Conductor and AYO music director Antun Poljanich says Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 was the dawn of a new age in music. “There is nothing to compare with its humanity and exaltation.” Auckland Youth Choir will sing a selection of unaccompanied works before a brief interval and the entire 70-minute symphony.

Familiar with most of Beethoven’s earlier symphonies, the vibrant and dynamic AYO will perform this masterpiece for the first time in its sixty-four year history. Following its spectacular performance of Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade in April, this concert is bound to be another unforgettable experience.

The symphony was groundbreaking at the time and made an indelible mark on the development of Western music. The Ode to Joy from the last movement has become understood as an expression of strength through unity and the triumph of the human spirit over adversity.

This concept has been embraced with the Auckland Youth Choir being augmented at the concert with singers from the Tauranga Civic Choir.

Quick facts
1. The Ode to Joy from the last movement is the official anthem of the European Union and final thrilling bars were used to draw the Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Concert to a never-to-be-forgotten close.

2. It was the last of Beethoven’s symphonies, completed in 1824, just three years before his death.

3. The symphony was premiered in Vienna on May 7, 1824. By this time, Beethoven was completely deaf. At the end of the piece, the crowd burst into applause but Beethoven, who had been a few measures behind the symphony, continued to conduct. The alto soloist, Caroline Unger, walked over to Beethoven and turned him around so he could accept the rousing applause.

4. Don’t think Beethoven has any affect on your day to day life? Think again. When Philips first introduced the compact disc (CD), there was much argument about the size it should be. Initially they planned to have a 11.5 cm diameter CD, while Sony planned on 10 cm. Eventually it was agreed that the CD should have the capacity to contain a complete performance of Beethoven 9 lasting 65 to 74 minutes, requiring a 12 cm diameter.

Media contact:
For more information, interview requests or photos please contact Alex MacDonald, Publicist, Auckland Youth Orchestra, m: 021 210 0630, e: alex.macdonald.ayo@gmail.com

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