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Flora Photographica Aotearoa


Fri 22 Aug 2014, 11:00am–3:00pm
Sat 23 Aug 2014, 11:00am–3:00pm
Wed 27 Aug 2014, 11:00am–3:00pm
Thu 28 Aug 2014, 11:00am–3:00pm
Fri 29 Aug 2014, 11:00am–3:00pm

Where: McNamara Gallery Photography, 190 Wicksteed Street, Whanganui, Manawatu / Whanganui

Restrictions: All Ages

Ticket Information:

  • Admission: Free

Related Artists:

Listed by: 190wic

Laurence Aberhart, Greta Anderson, Wayne Barrar, Janet Bayly, Andrew Beck, Gary Blackman, Rhondda Bosworth, Joyce Campbell, Ben Cauchi, Max Coolahan [1918–1985], Lisa Crowley, Derek Henderson, Frank Hofmann [1916–1989], John Johns [1924–1999], Ian Macdonald, Anne Noble, Richard Orjis, Fiona Pardington, Peter Peryer, Haruhiko Sameshima, C. Brian Smith

‘Flowers, in art, are usually less innocent and more complicated than might be imagined…’ [1]
They ‘…are privileged objects of the imagination not because they are the most beautiful but because they are the most imaginable.’ [2]. From its beginning photography has engaged with science and developed a special relationship with flower motifs. Images of the great variety of different plant and flower species serve as a ‘substitute’ for the traditional herbarium.

Photographers’ frame our indigenous and exotic botanical world, depicting isolated specimens or plant groupings, both arranged and in the natural environment. Repeating themes are formalism, repetition, lyricism, symbolism and metaphor; including subjects anthropomorphized through photography, and traditional notions associated with the flower as a marker for the transience, ambivalence and beauty of human existence. Expanding this aspect ‘…the uncompromised beauty of the flowers, which never perishes, their concept and identity as objects of beauty remain intact, eternal, despite their imminent fate.’ [3].

In this changing world, our physical co-dependence on plants, and their environment, is becoming increasingly evident; emphasizing the connectedness of all things.

[1] Elaine Scarry, ‘Imagining Flowers: Perceptual mimesis (particularly delphinium)’, Representations, No.57, Winter 1997, p 94

[2] Andrew Graham-Dixon, The Independent, 1992

[3] Jiang Zhi, ‘Love Letters’ 31.5,12