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National Geographic Live presents Ocean Wild

When:

Thu 22 Oct 2015, 7:30pm–9:30pm

Where: Soundings Theatre, Te Papa, 55 Cable Street, Wellington

Restrictions: All Ages

Ticket Information:

  • From: $49.00
  • Additional fees may apply

Website:

Listed by: Sandra Roberts

National Geographic adventurer Brian Skerry has spent over 10,000 hours underwater, using his camera to tell the story of some of the ocean’s most elusive inhabitants. His images will not only steal your breath but break your heart.

The US-based extreme photographer is coming to New Zealand in October as part of the National Geographic Live series, to share his adventures and offer a unique portrait of creatures from the deep. Brian holds both New Zealand and its species very dear to his heart, having spent a considerable amount of time here in our icy southern waters capturing the world’s most endangered whale, the right whale.

His mission: to enlighten and inspire people to care about the beauty, bounty, and health of the world’s oceans.

Join Brian live on stage for an intimate look at dolphins’ intelligence, hang out with the endearing Arctic harp seal, discover the truth about the global fish crisis, and join him on his adventure with the University of Auckland to New Zealand’s westernmost outpost, Enderby Island, where he’s mobbed by these curious creatures.

“It’s this sort of behaviour that really speaks to their name—they were the ‘right whale’ for whalers to target because they were large, slow, curious and easily approachable—all attributes which led to their demise.”

Having achieved his childhood dream of becoming a National Geographic photographer in 1998, Brian admits he’s succeeded beyond his wildest dreams, but there’s a catch: He set out to capture the wonder of the underwater world but didn’t expect to capture its destruction.

“I wanted to do pretty pictures. In the ’70s, ’80s, I would see these huge schools of fish. I don’t see that today. I would see a lot of sharks, coral reefs. Many of those places, they’re gone now. We’ve lost 50 per cent of the coral reefs in the world, and 90 per cent of the big fish. We kill 100 million sharks a year. That’s visible. What I’ve personally witnessed in those years has been traumatic. My hope is that we can turn it around.”

Brian has also worked on assignment for or had images featured in magazines such as People, Sports Illustrated, US News and World Report, BBC Wildlife, GEO, Smithsonian, Playboy, Esquire, Audubon, Men’s Journal and in countless publications worldwide. He is also the author/photographer of five books.

Through his captivating photography, Brian has helped open the door to a greater understanding of a world unknown to many. On stage Brian is a passionate spokesman for the oceans he loves to photograph, his riveting presentations inspire reverence for the marine realm and most of all they offer hope for protecting the vitality of the world’s oceans.

Some may see this inhibiting, but he consistently delivers thought provoking and captivating images that offer a unique and intimate portrait of creatures from the deep, and draws attention to the large number of issues that endanger their existence.

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