Ka Tangi a Wharauroa (Spring Seminars)

When:

Wed 15 Nov 2017, 6:00pm–7:30pm

Where: Central City Library, 44-46 Lorne St, CBD, Auckland

Restrictions: All Ages

Ticket Information:

  • Admission: Free

Refreshments from 5:30pm

The pīpīwharauroa, the shining cuckoo, is a migratory bird welcomed by Māori as a harbinger of Spring. Ka tangi te wharauroa, ko karere a Mahuru.

I ia marama, ka tuku ngā kauhau taonga mā ngā kairangahau Māori.

Central Library is delighted to invite you to join us for this very special series of seminars by kairangahau Māori. Each month a Māori researcher will present their work in kaupapa Māori areas – an opportunity for new learning as we welcome Spring together.

- Tuesday 12 September
Kōrero Māori mai – Te Reo Māori panel discussion

He aha te kai a te rangatira? He kōrero. For Māori Language Week, we present a panel discussion on what it means to kōrero as non-Māori. We are joined by Jennifer Ward-Lealand (Ngāti Pākehā) and Lidu Gong (Ngāti Haina), both fluent speakers committed to whakamana te reo rangatira. The panel will be facilitated by Peeni Henare, current MP for Tāmaki Makaurau electorate.

- Wednesday 20 September
'Stars of Aroha' with Tess Moeke-Maxwell

Tess Moeke-Maxwell will present her research in creating Stars of Aroha, a new book and resource that combines elements from the natural environment with Māori mythology to deliver meditation readings. These tools are designed for both beginners and more advanced meditators, to advance their spiritual potential and cultivate peace through the practice of guided meditation.

- Wednesday 11 October
'A Land of Milk and Honey?' With Tracey McIntosh

As a woman of Māori descent, Tracey McIntosh is committed to addressing issues that concern Māori, and her research and publications reflect this. She joins us to discuss her research around issues related to Māori incarceration, and her new sociology textbook A Land of Milk and Honey?

Making Sense of Aotearoa New Zealand. Despite being a textbook, this edited collection of essays explores where we have come from, where we are now, and what path New Zealand society might have embarked on. It is a lively introduction to our politics, our problems, and our people.

- Wednesday 15 November
'Tupuna Awa' with Marama Muru-Lanning

Marama Muru-Lanning will share her research from her book Tupuna Awa, which looks at the people and politics of the Waikato River. For iwi and hapū who live along the river banks, the awa is an ancestor, a taonga and a source of mauri.

Muru-Lanning shines a light on the debate surrounding the river and the politics of guardianship and water ownership, providing a human context to the discussion by sharing the stories from those who live along the river banks.

People who liked this also checked out