Sorry, this event’s been and gone
Sunroom

When:

Tue 27 Jun 2017, 3:30pm–9:30pm
Wed 28 Jun 2017, 3:30pm–9:30pm
Thu 29 Jun 2017, 3:30pm–9:30pm
Fri 30 Jun 2017, 3:30pm–9:30pm
Sat 1 Jul 2017, 3:30pm–9:30pm

Where: UDB, 23 Princes Street, Dunedin

Restrictions: All Ages

Ticket Information:

  • Admission: Free

Website:

Listed by: trudylane

Come stare at Te Rā, the sun – safely!

A large projection of the sun from solar telescopes in Dunedin, Dresden, and outer space is beaming in to warm up your winter. Check the Sunroom website for times of public discussions on astrophysics, energy, ecologies, and cosmologies – everyone is welcome.

For more information on related public events, see below and: http://www.sunroom.exchange/

Related public events: Sun-side chats and whizzbang weekends

Sun storms
Craig Rodger, Physics, University of Otago
Mon 19, 6:30pm
A discussion of space weather and how energy flows from the sun impact the environment on and around the Earth—including the recent auroras and the larger solar storms which hold the potential to destroy our digital communication infrastructures.

A bi-cultural discussion - creation narratives and quantum physics
Rua McCallum, David Hutchinson
Thu 22, 6:30pm
Join us for an informal bi-cultural discussion between Rua McCallum, a researcher exploring creation narratives as part of her PhD, and quantum physicist David Hutchinson. An ongoing conversation, born from a position of love and respect.

Sizzling sun science show
Amadeo Enriquez Ballestero of Dunedin Astronomical Society
Sat 24, 3:30pm
Come enjoy an amazing interactive science show about the sun! Hold with your own hands the gases that make our star. Make a comet that will behave as explosively as a real comet approaching the sun! Experience the power of ultraviolet light and discover why using sun block in New Zealand is so important.

The sun as a star
Ian Griffin, Otago Museum
Thu 29, 6:30pm
Ian Griffin, Director of Otago Museum and amateur astronomer extraordinaire, discusses his own fascinations with stars—their physics, scales and the wider contexts of the fiery maelstrom that is our star.