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Democracy 2020

When:

Mon 22 Jun 2020, 12:00pm–2:00pm
Tue 23 Jun 2020, 12:00pm–2:00pm
Wed 24 Jun 2020, 12:00pm–2:00pm
Thu 25 Jun 2020, 12:00pm–2:00pm
Fri 26 Jun 2020, 12:00pm–2:00pm

Where: Virtual Location, Online, Virtual

Restrictions: All Ages

Ticket Information:

  • Admission: Free

Listed by: seonaid2

Live webinar series hosted by Auckland Libraries, in association with Ancestry and Ancestry ProGenealogists 22-26 June 2020

​Stories through the evolution of New Zealand’s democracy
The 2020 New Zealand General Election is scheduled to take place on 19 September.

The very first national elections in NZ occurred in 1853, when there were only 5849 registered voters. In order to be registered on that electoral roll, voters needed to be male, British subjects, and property owners. In addition, they were almost exclusively Pākehā. Over time, the franchise was extended to Māori and women. Today, the current electoral roll numbers more than 3 million people.

This webinar series features presentations which cover a broad range of stories from New Zealand’s elections and electoral rolls, going all the way back to 1853.

Free access to the New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981 on Ancestry.com.au

In partnership with this series, Ancestry is offering New Zealanders the chance to explore for free over the week of the webinars, 22-28 June 2020, the millions of records contained in the New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981. Electoral rolls were published consistently nationwide and provide a useful way to find out more about ancestors and family members over time and place. Over 20 million names have been indexed in this collection. Search the New Zealand, Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981 on Ancestry.com.au.

Join host Seonaid Lewis, (Auckland Libraries) and co-host Michelle Patient, (Ancestry ProGenealogists) each day this week for a series of live webinars at 12pm from Monday 22 June to Friday 26 June 2020.

Register for each day in advance, and the Zoom link will be sent to you automatically so you can add it to your online calendar.

Five daily webinars

Māori and democracy
Monday 22nd June 12pm-2pm
*Introduction: Individual stories from the NZ electoral roll collections on Ancestry, with Jason Reeve, family historian, Ancestry
*The origins of the Māori seats – Professor Andrew Geddis, Otago University
*Māori and voting - Dr Maria Bargh, Associate Professor, Victoria University of Wellington

19th century: Voting and property ownership
Tuesday 23rd June 12pm-2pm
*Introduction: Individual stories from the NZ electoral roll collections on Ancestry, with Jason Reeve, family historian, Ancestry
*Development of the voting system, from propertied men to universal suffrage - Dr Jim McAloon, Professor of History, Victoria University of Wellington

Women’s suffrage
Wednesday 24th June 12pm-2pm
*Introduction: Individual stories from the NZ electoral roll collections on Ancestry, with Jason Reeve, family historian, Ancestry
*The Women’s Suffrage Campaign - Megan Hutching, oral historian and author
*“From Suffrage to a Seat in the House” - Jenny Coleman, Director - Associate Professor of Feminist History, Massey University
*The petition for universal suffrage 1893; stories from Taranaki, with Christine Clement, professional family and local historian

New Zealand’s political figures
Thursday 25th June 12pm-2pm
*Introduction: Individual stories from the NZ electoral roll collections on Ancestry, with Jason Reeve, family historian, Ancestry
*NZ’s “top-10” Prime Ministers - Dr Michael Bassett, author and former politician
*Putting flesh on the bones; providing context for family history - Judith Bassett

Modern politics – 20thC to MMP
Friday 26th June 12pm-2pmm
*Introduction: Individual stories from the NZ electoral roll collections on Ancestry, with Jason Reeve, family historian, Ancestry
*Why New Zealand is not a democracy - Dr Grant Duncan, Associate Professor, Massey University
*Inequality and the Vote - Dr Toby Boraman, Massey University