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Beneath our feet: archaeological stories of place

Where: Tūranga TSB Space, 60 Cathedral Square, Christchurch

Restrictions: All Ages

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Join an array of archaeologists and heritage storytellers for a selection of short talks that bring to life the stories of places and landscapes in Ōtautahi Christchurch and beyond. Archaeology is, at it's most simple, a way of understanding the lives of past peoples through the traces they leave behind, in and on the land. As part of New Zealand Archaeology Week 2021, this evening of archaeological storytelling showcases the different ways that the past can be reimagined, revisited and made real through the stories of places that were once inhabited or occupied by those who have passed before us.

Our speakers include archaeologists, historians and storytellers from a variety of backgrounds and organisations.

Joseph Hullen (Ngāti Hinematua, Ngā Tūāhuriri) is a member of Matapopore a mana-whenua cultural advisory group providing cultural advice to CERA, Ōtākaro Limited and Regenerate Christchurch. He has previously worked as a Cultural Observer with Witter Archaeology during the bulk earthworks phase of Pegasus Town.

Rosemary Baird is an Outreach Advisor at Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. She has a doctorate in oral history, and her latest work project has been making an archaeology podcast: Aotearoa Unearthed: Archaeology for Everyone.

Clara Watson is an archaeologist and historic artefact specialist at Underground Overground Archaeology. She is responsible for cataloguing the artefacts recovered from Christchurch archaeological sites and interpreting them in reports.

Katie Pickles is Professor of History at the University of Canterbury. Her research and teaching interests include Christchurch's cultural heritage and heroines in history. She is the author of Christchurch Ruptures (Bridget Williams Books, 2016) and is currently completing a monograph Heroines in History: A Thousand Faces (Routledge). Her next project is a new biography of Kate Sheppard.

Katharine Watson is fascinated by old houses, and the stories of the people who built and lived in them. As such, it's no surprise that she's currently doing her PhD at the University of Canterbury, analysing how class affected the houses people built in nineteenth century Christchurch.

TJ O'Connell is an archaeologist working at South Island Archaeology Ltd, based in Christchurch. his work takes him all around different parts of the South Island, including Canterbury and the West Coast. He really enjoys the process of discovery involved in archaeological excavations and the interpretation of sites he works on.

Hatesa Seumanutafa has worked for eight years in curatorship and collections management projects focused on Polynesian, Māori, Colonial, Antarctic, Asian and Middle Eastern cultural material. Her passion for museums and heritage evolved after a visit to Canterbury Museum as a teenager, where she encountered the wealth, intelligence and mana of the people of Oceania. Hatesa works to stimulate indigenous participation in establishing practices and discussions relevant to Pacific cultural heritage, lived experiences, representation, interpretation and conservation of our shared cultural heritage.

Jessie Garland is an archaeologist and material culture specialist currently based in Christchurch. She is currently undertaking her doctorate through La Trobe University, Melbourne, on the nineteenth century artefact assemblage recovered from Christchurch over the last decade, researching questions of trade and consumerism in the colonial city from 1850-1900.

PLEASE NOTE: Registrations are required in case of any changes in Covid-19 alert levels and for contact tracing requirements. Should the alert level change from Level 1 to Level 2, attendance will be limited to the first 100 registrations.

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